New bird for me – I think – maybe – well, a nice bird any ways!

Well, on Thursday I got home from a 90-minute walk around Gooseberry and looked at my pictures and said wow! That’s a spotted sandpiper – I’ve never seen one before.

The underwing pattern was a huge clue!

The underwing pattern was a huge clue!’

And, of course, the spotted breast helps.

And, of course, the spotted breast helps.

And while de does tend to blend in witht he beach, those bright yellow -orangish -legs do stand out!

And while de does tend to blend in with  the beach, those bright yellow -orangish -legs do stand out!

My problem is when I search this journal I find that I identified one before – but now that I look at those pictures from four years ago I am certain about the latest identification, but not at all certain about what I saw in 2009! (OK – maybe it’s in non-breeding plummage – but in May?)

That said, Don and I ha d a nice morning walk near low tide in what was less than ideal conditions – but good for the way the weather has been here throughout June and July. And yes, the shorebird migration is in full swing, though we didn’t se a whole lot of evidence of it.

They may be "common" but they are quite beautiful in flight - real sports cars when it comes to twisting and -eh - terning ;-)

They may be “common” but they are quite beautiful in flight – real sports cars when it comes to twisting and -eh – terning 😉

Common Terns were  out in force at the southeast point. I’ve seen them there before and I’m not sure what draws them to gather there – most of the time I’m lucky if I see one or two – not a dozen or two.

The bright orange beak with a black tip helps identify them.

The bright orange beak with a black tip helps identify them.

Ran into Paul and he said that while the  piping plovers are doing well at Horseneck and elsewhere, they don’t seem to have nested at Gooseberry, though an area is seta side for them as usual.  He noted some whimbrel did and we saw one of these long-legged waders at the south end.

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Some doves put on a flying exhibition near the towers and while Paul reported yellow warblers, we saw none. what were out in force were the swallows. Seemed a bit early for them to be flocking, but there they were. Could watch these little dudes for hours!

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4 Responses to New bird for me – I think – maybe – well, a nice bird any ways!

  1. jessamyn says:

    I saw the whimbrels at Cherry&Webb and had a heck of a time IDing them because their range doesn’t indicate that they come anywhere near here on the maps in my older bird books. Saw a lot of different Sandpipers there too.

    • Greg Stone says:

      Yep, range sure changes. Today I photographed a Great White Heron at Allens Pond. In my 1948 Petersons Guide it says they never get north of Miami! We have a lot of birds here now I never saw as a kid.

  2. Jerry Fishbein says:

    Spotted, Least and semipalmated sandpipers along with Ruddy Turnestones all gathering at high tide on Saturday. Re whimbrels, they wer just about wiped out (shot and and eggs were collected ) in our area but they certainly have made an osprey like comeback.

  3. Greg Stone says:

    Hmmm . . . Jerry – I’m wondering if you;re the guy I ran into at the south point on Saturday – you were with a small group of people, obviously knew your birds, and we talked about the Eiders?

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