So let’s get started with the common gulls

I need to visit Gooseberry. I need to visit Goosberry or like Melville’s Ismael  I’ll start walking down the street and methodically knocking people’s hat’s off because it is, indeed, a “bleak November in my soul” and America’s deteriorating and hate-filled political scene is the cause of it – and that’s the last you’ll read of politics here.

I go to Gooseberry to escape politics and to renew my faith in life and love, a simple mission.  i just want to get out and doing. I spend too much time of late indoors at the computer or sitting in my chair getting fat on books. The second-hand stuff has its place, but I really need to draw on life as a whole, not as a symbol world of abstractions thrice removed.

So here I am – it’s 4 pm on September 8, 2009 and I have just made  my first excursion – of this particular incarnation – to Gooseberry. And I will start my report of it with some of the most common and beautiful creatures, the gulls. And let’s start with the bully of the gull world as I understand it, the Great Black Backed – and in this case it is September, so we meet an immature example.

Ahhh. . . but what a handsome dude. An immature, great black-backed gull.

Ahhh. . . but what a handsome dude. An immature, Great Black-backed gull. He was sitting on a rock at the entrance to the causeway, but he let me pass without comment. I leaned out the window and snapped his photo for the record.

The Ring-billed gull seems to be common and plentiful.

Ring-billed gull in first winter plummage - a little weird, but I'm pretty sure I have that right.

Ring-billed gull in first winter plummage - a little weird, but I'm pretty sure I have that right.

And, of course, the Herring gull – the most common, I believe.

Mature herring gull.

Mature Herring gull.

And before I can get half-way across the causeway, here comes a what?  Sandpiper of sorts. And I photograph him and have to wait unti later to compare the photographs with what I find in Sibley. A Semipalmated Plover, right? Looks it to me. But you be the judge.  Here he is on the causeway, and in the air to the east.

This semipalmated plover came fromt he west side of the causeway, flew ahead of me, landed onthe causeway, pecked about,t hen flew off the eastside and headed north. I took the pictures through the open carw indow.  Nice start!

This Semipalmated Plover came from the west side of the causeway, flew ahead of me, landed on the causeway, pecked about, then flew off the east side and headed north. I took the pictures through the open car window. Nice start! (Click image for a larger view.)

In the water and on the rocks there were a good number of Cormorants -Double-crested, I believe.

Double-crested cormorants.

Double-crested Cormorants.

Meanwhile, back on land, grasshoppers – large, brown ones that buzz when they fly – were common. I don’t know their name.

grasshopper

. . . and different types of white and yellow butterflies – I need to get my identification book and figure these out. (See this post.)

white_butterfly

Beach rose? beach plumb? You would think I would know by now. I don’t. All I know is its one of the most common, low-growing plants on Gooseberry. (I saw a video online where the person called these “gooseberries.” They are not. Wish uI could find some gooseberries out here – but I haven’t.)

beach_rose

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